Nullarbor

Then it was off for that long awaited drive across the Nullarbor. I was eager to get going. If you are a mad keen Golfer you can play all the way across. The first tee is at Kalgoorlie and the l8th hole is 1365 kilometres away in Ceduna.

We met a couple that was playing the course. He was very excited but she didn’t share his enthusiasm. It was about $80 per person, for you money you get a scorecard, which they use to give you a certificate at the end to say you have completed the course. He told us about all the different courses along the way they were planning to stop at. I guess you have to love golf to do something like that but it is a different way to see the Nullarbor.

There are roadhouses roughly every two hundred ks along the way. Nothing flash or should I say not many were inviting. Each one has its only uniqueness and they all seemed to love their signs.

nul signs 12

The Nullarbor comes form the Latin ‘Nullus’ and ‘Arbor’ meaning ‘no Trees’ while the Aboriginal name is ‘Oondiri’ meaning ‘the waterless’. With this in mind we were surprised to see how many tree there was and how green everything seem to be as we drove along. Ok they were not large tree but they were trees. There are a lot of camping spot along the road, which take advantage of tree areas giving shad to a rest area. In some of the rest areas you can wind you way back further into the bush for some privacy and less highway noise. We took our time and kept to our plan to drive about 200ks a day.

We took detours along the way to see the ocean. Wow oh wow oh wow. It was mind-blowing. The first time we stopped there was a little sea breeze in the air and some morning fog. We could see the waves crashing against the cliffs. How could anyone say going across the Nullarbor is boring? This was amazing. I would have loved to camp there for several days but that is a big no no. (Note for next time; do you think anyone will come out to check? Something to think about.) There are some lovely flowers if you stop and look. They look so small and delicate I saw them on the way back to the car.

 

 

 

 

 

nul hole

 

We stopped at some small caves. There are about 20 of them along the way. They are said to have kilometres of spacious passages some even with lakes. We just looked at a hole. Mmm I think I will give it a miss next time.

 

 

There wasn’t as much traffic as I though there would be being the Nullarbor is the main road across. We did see some mining trucks and some old vintage cars.

What we didn’t see and we thought we would was wild life. We expected to see lots of Kangaroos and cows or goats. But there was nothing, not even a dingo. Basically the only wild life were some birds when we stopped at The Bight. The ones with the black Zorro mask maybe a Welcome Swallow the other one????

We had to pay to go see the cliffs as there is a visitor centre at “The Bight”. It is very popular in whale watching season (We didn’t see any whales.) I laughed as we turned into the drive as there was a sign with the time the visitor centre was open, at the bottom of the sign it said South Australian time not West Australian times. Just as we were about to enter the building there was another sign stating among other things “No Drones” I thought that was interesting. A no fly zone over a cliff in the middle of nowhere. How would they police it?

We discovered just after Caiguna that time changes by half the Time different of WA and SA. It eases you into the time difference. Nice. The next instalment of time change is at the border. We were expecting to go through quarantine at the WA SA border but when you enter South Australia the quarantine station is at Ceduna. We talked to some travelers that were cooking up everything in their fridge before the border. We waited until Ceduna and by that time there wasn’t much left in the fridge to worry about. We were concerned about honey and make an effort to use it all before we arrived only to be told most honey was ok to bring into SA.

 

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